Check Out Our Advertisers!
     None  Accounting/Bookkeeping
     None  Attorney - Lawyer
     None  Auto
     None  Aviation
     None  Banks and Credit Unions
     None  Carpet Cleaning
     None  Chamber of Commerce
     None  Chiropractic Care
     None  Churches
     None  Computer Services
     None  Dental Care
     None  Dry Cleaning
     None  Electric utility
     None  Equine Services
     None  Excavating
     None  Eye Care
     None  Feed Stores
     None  Field Mowing
     None  Financial Services
     None  Fireplace Sales/Service
     None  Flooring
     None  Food Products
     None  Funeral Home
     None  Gun Accessories
     None  Hair/Nail Care and Cosmetics
     None  Handyman Services
     None  Health Care Facilities and Services
     None  Health Care
     None  Heating and Cooling
     None  Home Maintenance
     None  House Cleaning
     None  Insulation
     None  Insurance
     None  Internet Service
     None  Jewelry
     None  Liquor Stores
     None  Orthodontist
     None  Pet Grooming
     None  Pet Sitter
     None  Physician
     None  Plumbing
     None  Portable Buildings
     None  Propane Delivery
     None  Propane
     None  Property Management
     None  Racing - Cars
     None  Real Estate Services
     None  Restaurants
     None  Roofing
     None  Schools
     None  Senior Citizens Services
     None  Septic Services
     None  Sheds, Outbuildings
     None  Shipping Services
     None  Small Engine Repair
     None  Specialty/Gifts
     None  Storage
     None  Tax Preparation
     None  Tile - Installation and Repair
     None  Tires
     None  Tractor, Trailer and RV Sales
     None  Upholstery
     None  Veterinarian
     None  Window Replacement
     None  Windshield Repair
     None  Winery
     None  Woodworking


 
“Snowflakes are one of nature's most fragile things, but just look what they can do when they stick together.”
– Vesta M. Kelly  
Contact Us | Advertise | Classified Ad | News Stands | Subscribe  

  Volume No. 15 Issue No. 12 December 2018  

None
None Black Forest News   None Book Review   None Community Calendar   None Community Photos  
None Did You Know?   None FFPD Column   None FFPD News   None From the Publisher  
None Marks Meanderings   None Monkey Business   None News Briefs   None News From D 49  
None Pet Care   None Phun Photos   None Prairie Life   None Rumors  
None
Front Page   |   Feature Stories   |   Search This Issue   |   Log In
None
 
  Amendment 74 – property rights for all Coloradans

   The authors of the U.S. Constitution believed that property rights are an aspect of our freedom. The freedom to use land, our most precious resource, for the necessities of life; to be fairly compensated for it; and to fight for our right to keep it.
   
   However, this freedom is at stake. Colorado’s state and local governments can take more than 90% of the value of private property before the owner has any recourse — a number that should both shock and disappoint all Coloradans. Amendment 74 is the protection we need.
   
   As Secretary of the Interior, I saw the critical role property owners play in our economic and environmental successes. When people own land, they value it for today and the future. However, activists are working to destroy the rights of farmers, families, and businesses with friendly governments standing by their side.
   
   Amendment 74 is a straightforward ballot measure. It brings balance between property rights and regulations, while leaving a history of judicial decisions in place. However, it changes one important factor: the extent of an owner’s loss. It does not take power and responsibility away from town councils, county commissioners and other Colorado regulators, but it allows owners to push back on actions that damage their property’s value. It creates a much-needed check on the system at a time we need it most.
   
   While opponents of Amendment 74 are using scare tactics and saying it will cost governments too much money, their claims are misleading. The fact is, costs would only occur after an individual party meets all the requirements to prevail in court and strict guidelines remain in place.
   
   Ultimately, Amendment 74 provides the necessary protection Colorado property owners deserve. Vote YES on 74 and keep Colorado a place for property owners to proudly call home.
   
   Gale Norton
   Former U.S. Secretary of the Interior Gale Norton served from 2001-2006.
  
Facebook print this page      

  Park Forest Water District Board

   “When..not if” is expert consensus about the next big Black Forest fire, often voiced by Black Forest Together. Fire is not taken seriously in the Park Forest Water District (PFWD), which covers approximately 300 households in the Black Forest. The Park Forest Water District Board of Directors seem to neglect public service and are assuming liabilities, both of which makes us less safe. The Board of Directors refuses to add fire prevention and control to other worthy objectives in their PFWD Mission. Two attorneys, Paul Anderson and MacDougall, Woldridge & Worley, seem to be misguiding the Board. Mission Statement aside, PFWD neglects to take reasonable actions to provide water resources to fight the next Black Forest fire. Instead, the Board squanders water and financial resources.
   
   The PFWD Board, led by Pam Sekac, recently succeeded in causing 20 acre feet (6,500,000 gal) of the District’s water to drain downstream for no good reason, nor gain. Instead, this Board action cost District members nearly $60,000. The wasted water was stored in one three acre pond and one two acre pond on our property — the ponds (were) heavily used by military helicopters to fight the 2013 Black Forest Fire. Water delivered by Blackhawk and Chinook helicopters saved many homes and structures in the Burgess and Vollmer Roads region. Perhaps water from these very ponds prevented the fire from crossing Burgess Rd. to burn Park Forest subdivision itself.  How ironic that Ms. Sekac’s spite against me and my family could permanently deprive the Black Forest community of this significant amount of water standing ready for easy access by helicopter fire buckets and Fire Department pumpers to fight fires in the future. 
   
   Members of the PFWD, prospective homebuyers and the insurance industry are mislead by the number of fire hydrants evident in the District. All of these hydrants connect to two tanks supplied by wells and pumps which can only supply enough water to operate two or three fire-hydrants at one time.  Need it be said that two or three fire-hydrants are insufficient to effectively fight multiple fires?  During the Black Forest Fire, PFWD could not supply water at all because the District had not installed back-up electricity generators.  Park Forest Subdivision homeowners, PFWD and residents of the surrounding Black Forest area are fortunate to be located near Cottonwood Creek where ponds are possible. Just like it was prudent to install onsite electricity generation, it is now prudent for the District to refill the ponds on our property and to take steps to encourage other pond owners in the District to maintain full ponds.  Encourage the PFWD Board to do so.
   
   See pfwd.co for more of the PFWD story.  Fire protection issues in the District requiring further action, include networking the pipelines, and encouraging residential sprinkler systems.
   
   Steve Jacobs
   Black Forest
  
Facebook print this page      


  © 2004-2018 The New Falcon Herald. All rights reserved. About | Contact | Advertise | News Stands | Privacy Policy